Recipes and Stories

3 July 2017: Shrimp and Corn Pie, or Pudding

July 3, 2017

Tags: Classic Southern Cooking, Lowcountry Cooking, Historical Southern Cooking, Corn, Shrimp

A Lowcountry Shrimp and Corn Pie is a perfect supper dish for a warm summer evening, whether you're having company or just family around your table.
One of the loveliest mid-summer supper dishes of the Carolina and Georgia Lowcountry is a simple casserole known in these parts as shrimp and corn pie. Traditionally, almost any custard-based dish cooked in a shallow casserole is called a “pie” in Carolina and Georgia, just as our version of macaroni and cheese is known as macaroni pie, although a similar dish would be called a “pudding” in Virginia or other parts of the South.

Well, no matter what you call it, it’s one of the happiest pairings of two of our best summer staples: (more…)

24 July 2015: Chicken and Corn Chowder

July 24, 2015

Tags: Corn, Corn Chowder, Chicken and Corn Chowder, Seafood Chowder, Classic Southern Cooking, Savannah Cookery, The Savannah Cookbook, Soup

Savannah Chicken and Corn Chowder, photographed in the dining room of the Historic Green-Meldrim House by John Carrington Photography
25 July 2015 Chicken and Corn Chowder

A lovely compensations for the intense, wet heat that settles over Savannah each summer like a warm wet blanket, is fresh sweet corn. And a popular, if a bit ironic, way of having that corn is in chowder, a rich yet simple soup that has been a fixture in Savannah for at least a century.

Recipes for it have been turning up in community cookbooks since the end of the nineteenth century, (more…)

17 July 2013: Suffering Succotash

July 17, 2013

Tags: Succotash, Corn, Butterbeans, Historical American Cooking, Classic Southern Cooking

Classic Succotash with fresh butterbeans, corn, tomatoes, and herbs
Succotash is a true American classic and arguably one of the greatest vegetable dishes in all of American cookery. Though what we know by the name today mostly likely bears very little resemblance to the original, this mélange of corn and beans originated in Pre-Colombian America, and still carries its Native American name.

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